Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects

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Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects

Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Exterior photography, windows, facadeWildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Interior photography, living room, chair, beamWildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Exterior photography, windows, beamWildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Interior Photography, Bench, Chair, Garden, Patio, Yard+ 28

Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Exterior photography, windows, facade
© Soumitro Ghosh

Text description provided by the architects. The land near the forest, at the foot of an adjoining former local family tea estate, has become the weekend home for a couple from Bangalore. Besides capturing mountain and valley views, creating a vantage point, creating different blocks for living and retreating at night, and having common areas for daily living with sunlight; within it are much deeper questions and things that inform this design.

Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Exterior Photography
© Soumitro Ghosh
Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Image 23 of 28
Ground floor Plan
Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Interior Photography, Bench, Chair, Garden, Patio, Yard
© Soumitro Ghosh
Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Interior photography, table, chair, garden, patio, yard
© Soumitro Ghosh

This house, at first conceived as a singular entity, quickly fragmented with the fascinating opportunity of the central sitting area which would overlook the setting sun on the horizon over the mountains and distant valleys – mostly forested. This has become the most important place in the house other than the sheltered areas. This is anchored close to an existing Jamun tree and this becomes the heart of the project. The living room, dining room, casual seating, kitchen, a cozy loft loft for grandkids and adults, and powder room come together in one large barn/studio-like space celebrating the presence of the northern sunlight with a skylight running the length of the space. The light and patterns of sunlight coming through the skylight begin to change with seasons and times of day. The space is monochromatic in raw lime plaster from the walls to the entire roof seamlessly inside.

Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Interior photography, living room, chair, beam
© Soumitro Ghosh
Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Image 24 of 28
Plan – First floor
Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Interior Photography, Wood, Beam
© Soumitro Ghosh

The lounge block is adventurously cantilevered, breaking the constraints of supporting structures, towards the west and the mountains/valley with a large window opening and an armchair in this corner, to enjoy a large expanse of view and to be on the edge of the interior. At the center of the project – gently surrounded by the living room and the block of bedrooms is the patio which overlooks the landscape of wild grass, the valley, the mountains, the surrounding forests and the sunset on the horizon. The glass bridge made of steel and glass is like a tenuous link between the living space and the sleeping space. The modular structural framework and the transparency of the deck on the environment, with the luxury of green, sunlight and a view of the patio make it a passage and a “moment”.

Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Exterior photography, windows, stairs, facade, garden, handrail
© Soumitro Ghosh
Wildgrass House in the Nilgiris / Mathew and Ghosh Architects - Image 27 of 28
Section BB

Architecture in sensitive ecologies requires careful attention in design, material selection and detailing. Some of the thoughtful balances that have been part of the material, design and project details of interest in this vision of care are: keeping most trees intact on the site, except for the removal of certain eucalyptus trees which occupy a large part of the underground water; collect and use roof water for irrigation; recharge the water table; keep the rocks found in the foundations intact without disturbing the natural formation of the ground; lime plaster on the exterior and interior of the building instead of cement plaster because it is ground manually and requires much less treatment than cement; use of natural boulders for road works and trails which are hand shaped and laid without much underlay material; retaining walls with the use of local stone and concrete; windows optimized for views and heat gain


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